A Day in Cambridge – 5 Things To Do

Written From… An airport bench in Heathrow, England, waiting to board my flight to Ecuador

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Having only spent a day in Cambridge on a mini relaxed getaway, I experienced the full charm of this quaint city. Staying in an Airbnb only a 15 minute walk away from the University grounds during my visit added to an enhanced and more immersive experience. 

When anyone thinks of Cambridge I think it’s safe to say that Cambridge University is one of the first things that comes to mind. Now, putting aside Academia, it was the architecture of this small and beautiful city, the many University buildings and courtyards, that really stood out. The detail, the old Harry Potter-esque architecture, the colours from the autumn leaves and the river quietly running through The Backs, collectively gave the city a touch of magic. Here are 5 things to do in Cambridge:
 

The Backs

Couple sitting on the river bank of the Backs in Cambridge, England
The Backs – Photo By Megan Jessica

The backs are a serene collection of green spaces lined by some of the University’s colleges and peacefully carved through by the River Cam. You can spend your time walking along the river bank and watching people punting.
 

The River Cam

Punting on the River Cam in Cambridge, England
Punting on the River Cam – Photo by Megan Jessica

Taking a lazy stroll along a river bank is one of my favourite things to do, whether that be in Cambridge, London, or even San Antonio. Throughout the paths along the River Cam, you will find plenty of opportunities to go punting, by which you can access some parts you just won’t be able to by foot.
 

The Courtyards

One of the many majestic courtyards in one of Cambridge's prestigious campuses
Court Yards in Cambridge Campus – Photo by Megan Jessica

There are a number of courtyards open to the public dotted around Cambridge. Many of the courtyards appear like backdrops plucked straight out from a movie scene – The Secret Garden and Harry Potter come to mind. These courtyards are part of the University and a lot of the time the surrounding buildings are used as student accommodation. Keep an eye out for little openings that you can duck into.  
 

The Mathematical Bridge

The mathematical bridge connecting two Cambridge campuses
The Mathematical Bridge – Photo by Megan Jessica

The Mathematical bridge may seem a little precarious – a little wooden structure connecting an arched entryway to the President’s Lodge in Queens College to the West Bank of the River Cam. The tale goes that Sir Isaac Newton built the bridge with nothing but wood. No bolts, no screws, just wood to show the principles of mathematics and gravity. The bridge was originally designed by William Etheridge and rebuilt twice.
 

Trinity College

The square of Trinity College, Cambridge
Trinity College, Cambridge – Photo by Megan Jessica

The prestigious home to an incredible list of alumni, such as Sir Isaac Newton, Srinivasa Ramanujan, and Francis Bacon; you can visit this part of the university for a small fee. When inside, you can view the courtyard, the chapel and the Wren Library.

All of these spots are in walking distance from each other, which makes exploring the city centre easy in a day and, at least for me, a lot more fulfilling.

 
Photos taken with Panasonic Lumix G7

Megan is the Co-founder of Written From. Her love of travel stems from a childhood dream to experience life abroad, of discovering something new outside of her well known territory, London. Not only a traveler but also a web junky, Megan enjoys snapping pictures, designing and making websites, drinking copious amounts of tea and having a good weekend Netflix binge.

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